Welcome to the IfMB

Institute for Microbiology and Biotechnology

The Institute of Microbiology and Biotechnology is dedicated to the study of microorganisms. They represent the numerically largest fraction of living matter on our planet and exhibit great diversity due to their adaptation to a wide variety of habitats.

Our research, which aims at a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms and functions of microbial biochemistry and cell biology, is an important prerequisite for the development of new biotechnological and medical applications. An overview and introduction to our current research projects and topics can be found here.

Our teaching offer includes modules in the courses of study B.Sc. Biology and M.Sc. Microbiology. For more information on specific courses and our institute colloquium, please see here.

News

Why inflating Yeast cells to five times their original size is a very SExY thing to do

A new protocol combines expansion microscopy with single-molecule imaging for fission yeast

Tracking Molecules at Turbo Speed

Being able to observe micro-organisms and their cellular components is key to understanding fundamental processes that go on inside cells—and thus potentially developing new medical treatments. Microbiologists and biophysicists from the University of Bonn have now developed a method that makes the high-throughput process for observing molecules five times faster, enabling insights to be gained into hitherto unknown cellular functions.

How Bacteria load their syringes

Many bacterial pathogens use small injection apparatuses to manipulate the cells of their hosts, such as humans, so that they can spread throughout the body. To do this, they need to fill their syringes with the relevant injection agent. A technique that tracks the individual movement of proteins revealed how bacteria accomplish this challenging task. A team of researchers from the University of Bonn and the Max Planck Institute in Marburg have revealed how bacteria perform this complex task, using a technology that tracks the movement of individual proteins. Their findings have now been published in the leading journal Nature Microbiology.

Winner of the DATIpilot Innovation Sprint Pitch

Start-up project Sweethoven Biotech with Dr. Marcel Hövels wins the DATIpilot Innovation Sprint Pitch Competition of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

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